Amber Retreat & Above The Tickle, Twillingate, Newfoundland


Did you know ...

The name Twillingate comes from the French word "Toulinquet" which was given to the islands by French fishermen, who named them after a group of islands off the French coast, near Brest, also called Toulinquet.

Newfoundland & Labrador itunes app

Whale Watching

The highlight of whale watching is seeing a whale tale above the surface. Every year from May to early July a variety of whales swim through the rich feeding waters along the coast of Newfoundland.

Finger on the Shutter

As many as 22 species of whales have been recorded in the waters around Newfoundland, such as humpbacks, fin whales, sperm whales, blue whales, minke whales, pilot whales and potheads. When going out by boat, keep your camera ready because you may see even dolphins, seals and a variety of sea birds.

Humpback and Minke Whales

Humpbacks and minke whales are the most common whale species but dolphins and fin whales are also occasionally seen. Humpback tails are as distinctive as human faces or fingerprints.

Lookout at Long Point

The lookout point at Twillingate’s Long Point Lighthouse is a good spot for whale watching, but a surprise may await anywhere along the coastline. Twillingate’s many tour operators have daily tours to bring you close to whales, icebergs and other marine life.

The coves and islands in Notre Dame Bay create the perfect conditions for sea kayaking – another perfect way to get close (not too close) to these sea mammals!

Twillingate is also the home of North America’s largest population of humpbacks, seabirds and yet both the sea and shores remain pristine and enchanting.